The goal of sober living homes is to monitor and improve health, safety and wellness using peer support. The goal of many halfway houses is to reduce recidivism among felons using supervision. However, some halfway houses are designed to reduce drug relapse rates for high-risk individuals leaving incarceration. Halfway houses are technically sober living environments, but there are many differences between halfway houses for people transitioning out of incarceration and sober homes for people in recovery from addiction.

Each Oxford House operates democratically, pays its own bills, and any member who returns to drinking alcohol or using drugs must be expelled. Large houses are rented and located in nice neighborhoods, giving anywhere from 6 to 15 same-gender individuals a safe, supportive place to call home, according to it’s website. Depending on the city, neighborhood and services offered, rent can range from $300 to $2,000 per month. Some sober homes do not require residents to pay utility bills, but utilities may be rationed to avoid waste.

What Do Oxford Houses Offer?

This study did not provide outcome data regarding residents’ experiences living in these recovery communities. Few methodologically sound studies have emerged in the area of traditional recovery homes. In one of the few recovery home longitudinal studies, Polcin (2006) found that 51% of recovery home residents were abstinent from drugs and alcohol at a six-month follow-up. Regrettably, there are few studies reporting differential outcome data contrasting recovery https://accountingcoaching.online/mash-certified-sober-house-transitional-living/ home and therapeutic community residential treatments for substance abuse. In part, this is due to the fact that it is hard to provide systemic long-term outcome data on these hard to reach, highly recidivist populations. In 2007, the Oxford House organization received about $1.6 million in grants from state and local governments to pay outreach workers to develop and maintain networks of individual Oxford Houses in nine States and the District of Columbia.

The daily schedule at sober living homes is heavily influenced by the residents’ current stage of recovery. Some homes are highly structured, with strict schedules and consistent eating and meeting times. In NARR homes, the goal is to protect the health of all residents, not to punish the resident experiencing relapse. In Oxford Houses, individuals who relapse cannot return until they complete a 28-day rehab program or complete treatment and demonstrate an ability to continually attend support group meetings.

What Are Sober Living Homes?

These results suggest that well-managed and governed recovery homes pose minimal risks to neighbors in terms of criminal behavior. There were only seventeen American Indian participants in our national NIDA study (Kidney, Alvarez, Jason, Ferrari, & Minich, 2009). Nevertheless, American Indians were no more likely to report more severe substance use, psychological problems, criminal histories, or lower incomes than other groups. In addition, American Indians were more likely to report being on parole or probation and being referred for aftercare by the legal system. Moreover, American Indians reported greater disharmony within their recovery residences than Caucasians, but there were no significant ethnic differences in length of stay in Oxford House.

The lower rate of incarceration (3% versus 9%) in the study among Oxford House versus usual care participants corresponded to annualized savings for the Oxford House sample of roughly $119,000. Together, the productivity and incarceration benefits yield an estimated $613,000 in savings accruing to the Oxford House participants. While Oxford House does not offer treatment of any kind, it is the first of its kind of highly organized, community living support system for those who are in some kind of treatment for substance abuse. Oxford Houses of Oklahoma is a network of addiction recovery homes chartered by Oxford House, Inc., the 501c3 umbrella corporation. According to its historical practice and its charter, any houses chartered by Oxford House Inc., can lose their charter if the homes stop applying the basic concepts and rules required by Oxford House Inc.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW A COPY OF THE FY2021 OXFORD HOUSE ANNUAL REPORT

Limited research, however, is available regarding how Oxford House settings compare to other treatments. Using cross sectional data, Ferrari, Jason, Davis, Olson, and Alvarez (2004) compared the operational policies of 55 Oxford Houses to those of 14 Therapeutic Communities (TCs). Neither type of facility permitted self-injurious behaviors (e.g., physical self-harm or misuse of medication) or destructive acts (e.g., destroying site property or others’ possessions). Oxford Houses, however, were significantly more liberal in permitting residents personal liberties compared to the TC facilities.

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We also believe that Oxford Houses and other community-based support system provide social scientists with rich opportunities to explore a vast array of psychological and sociological constructs. Clearly, psychologists with interests in community based support networks for substance abusers have ample research topics worthy of exploration, and this research may have public policy implications. Within our sample, 58.4% were Caucasian, 34.0% were African American, 3.5% were Hispanic, and 4% were other. Flynn, Alvarez, Jason, Olson, Ferrari, and Davis (2006) found that African Americans in Oxford House maintain ties with family members yet develop supportive relationships by attending 12-step groups and living in Oxford House. These different social networks are able to provide support for abstinence to African Americans. As of 2008, there were 321 women’s Oxford Houses with 2,337 women, and 982 men’s Oxford Houses with 7,487 men, for a total of 1,303 houses serving 9,824 people (Oxford House, 2008).

The houses are run by residents and emphasize peer support as an essential component of recovery. The services, rent, rules and living conditions at sober living homes vary from place to place. Some homes are part of a behavioral health care system where residents live next to a rehab clinic, participate in outpatient therapy Learn What Spiritual Malady Is And The Role It Plays In Your Recovery and have access to the clinic’s recreational activities. Following an application and approval process, individuals living in a house are expected to participate in a recovery program in the community during their residence. Oxford Houses are peer-driven, democratically run, and self-supported group residences.

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